13 thoughts on “SW 2nd Avenue, circa 1969

  1. This photo is later than 1962, as shown above, or 1965, as shown on the image. I’m guessing 1972, since I believe the white color car that’s parked near the intersection is an early 1970s Ford Pinto.

  2. I agree. Since the Pinto wasn’t introduced until 1971, the photo has to be sometime after that. It looks like there is also an early ’70s Plymouth Duster parked next to the Spaghetti Factory building.

  3. Funny there seems to be three dates, all of them wrong, associated with this photo. The headline to today’s post is “circa 1969”, the caption says “circa 1962” and the photo url says “1965-c…”.

    But clearly, as pointed about in comments above, this is a 70’s photo and also as Dana points out that style bumper on the Pinto started with the ’74 model year so this photo can’t be any older than late 1973 when the ’74 model year cars came out.

  4. And the old spaghetti factory’s website says they opened their first restaurant January 10, 1969.

    (I guess this would be a photo of the old ‘the old spaghetti factory’.)

  5. In late ’73 early ’74, US was in the middle of a gas shortage and that Pinto was a hot commodity (25 mpg). I wasn’t old enough to drive but remember the long lines with the flags and gas stations closed on Sundays.

  6. This is the Carriage & Baggage Building. It is currently the home of the Pine Street Market. Their website has some history of the building:

    http://www.pinestreetpdx.com/about/
    “Pine Street Market, which opened in the spring of 2016, is located in downtown Portland in the historic Carriage & Baggage Building and features nine of Portland’s best chefs and purveyors, in a casual, open layout.

    Built in 1886, the Carriage & Baggage Building was originally used as a livery and horse-drawn carriage storage facility until the early 1900s. With horse stalls on the second floor and four massive tanks on the roof that provided water to wash the stalls, the building was essentially a horse and carriage parking garage.

    When the automobile replaced the horse-drawn carriage, the building was used as storage and retail for Mallory Logging and Contractors Supplies for decades. From 1969 to 1981, the building was home to the original Portland’s Old Spaghetti Factory. Since the early 80’s, the ground floor housed a string of infamous Portland nightclubs.

    Listed on the National Register of Historic places, the Carriage & Baggage building is one of the few examples of a Portland livery. The massive Doug Fir timber frame structure has been retrofitted to modern seismic requirements and has retained the original skylight at the roof.”

    Here’s a current street view:

  7. One more comment about the Ford Pinto. Along with the 5 MPH bumpers starting in ’74 the taillights changed in ’77 so it had to be a ’74-’76 model. The Old Spaghetti Factory moved to John’s Landing in ’84-85. So, photo is between ’74 and ’84. The two newest autos on the street are the Pinto and the Duster (I think that half vinyl roof was only ’73-’74) So I’m guessing c-1975. Plus that guy’s hat was out of fashion by ’76. 🙂

  8. Again I point out that the title says “circa”. Nobody is or was saying the exact date is 69.

  9. So if you just say “circa” you can be off on something by, say, several years? I have pretty much gotten used to looking to the comments to get the actual information on the location and time of the photo.

  10. D. Johnson, regarding circa — true, it’s only an approximate date. But when there’s evidence to suggest a better and narrower approximation is possible it seems reasonable for us to try to do so.

  11. “I was sorry when they moved to the waterfront. I remember it looking like this and going to the warehouse part of Portland as a child with my family and sitting in the caboose. This franchise is in quite few states now.” -my wife

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