SE Portland House, 1929 – Help Us Out!

The City of Portland Archives sent this photo, trying to identify the location (or former location) of this lovely old Italianate house somewhere in Southeast Portland. It looks like a number 33 propped up on the front steps; if this is the address under the old numbering system, that helps a bit to narrow down the site. But if the house is gone, it’s location may be lost forever.

(City of Portland Archives)

West End Ross Island Bridge, 1932

The western approach to the Ross Island Bridge (here looking east) was a somewhat less complicated affair in 1932 than it is now. A tangle of streets and ramps now covers the bare lots on the left of this image, and I-5 now cuts under the bridge approach, all along the top of the photo. Corbett Avenue crosses the very end of the bridge ramp while Front Avenue, with the streetcar, crosses the bottom of the photo.

(City of Portland Archives)

NE Hancock Street, Irvington, 1912

We looked at some beautiful Irvington homes several weeks ago, and now we’re back in that neighborhood circa 1912. This appears to be a hand-lettered card used as advertising by Hassam Paving, whom we can assume paved this section of NE Hancock Street. Can anybody nail down this location and determine if these houses still exist?

(City of Portland Archives)

Couch’s Addition Map, 1891

There’s a lot of detail of this 1891 map of the Northwest Portland area now known as the Alphabet District, including Old Town/Chinatown and the Pearl District. The rail yards would eventually expand to the west but at this time they covered much of what is now the Post Office property. Note that the park blocks were bounded by “N. East Park” and “N. West Park” with “N. Eighth” to the west. Hand-lettered notations in red renumber the streets as we know them today.

(City of Portland Archives)

SW Broadway & Madison, 1935

A lot has changed in Portland since 1935 but this view north on SW Broadway from Madison Street has enough landmarks to make it recognizable today. The most notable changes are the Portland Center for the Performing Arts building now on the left, and the 1000 Broadway building that replaced the Broadway Theater on the right.

(City of Portland Archives)

South Auditorium Urban Renewal Area

The top photo shows houses that were typical of the South Auditorium Urban Renewal Area in 1962 and was intended to show the dilapidated state of the area. Most residents were older Jewish and Italian immigrants but also was home to Chinese, Greek and Irish residents.

The bottom photo from 1950 shows the area, bordered by SW Market and Arthur Streets, Harbor Drive and Fourth Avenue. The Auditorium is the full-block building at top center. At least 349 lots were acquired, 1,573 residents, including 336 families, and 289 businesses were relocated. 445 buildings were demolished. Compare this photo with the post-demolition aerial photo from 1964.

(City of Portland Archives)

(City of Portland Archives)