N Broadway, 1973

Aerial near Memorial Coliseum and N Broadway, 1973.

City of Portland (OR) Archives, North Portland at N Flint and N Broadway – Eliot Neighborhood 2 of 7, A2012-005.

View this image in Efiles by clicking here.

13 thoughts on “N Broadway, 1973

  1. The apartment building at 2 o’clock today (my daughter’s first place in Portland 2005).

  2. I still see some land there that hasn’t been turned into a freeway or a parking lot. Better get busy…

  3. You can see the Rose City Freeway quietly awaiting the results of the Mt. Hood Freeway revolt. Actually, by 1973 they may have already realized the Rose City would never be completed.

  4. A 1940s/’50s city planners vision of Portland at its worst. It looks like a Northwest version of L.A. Freeways going over freeways, sprawling parking lots, not as much traffic as La La Land, but urban/industrial sprawl everwhere in this photo. Yuck! There I said it. Sorry!

  5. So much to ponder! It’s 1pm, Aug 9, 1973 according to Efiles.

    But first, and most importantly, in the Veterans Memorial Coliseum, our beloved Trailblazers finished the 1972-73 season second to last in league, including a final game wallop by the Bucks–with 31 pts, 12 rebs from Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and 24 pts, 14 asts from Oscar Robertson. Our team included Larry Steele and Lloyd Neal, key members of our 1977 championship squad. Rick Adelman has just been traded to Chicago, but he soon returns to Oregon, first as coach at Chemeketa CC, then under Jack Ramsay and Mike Schuyler, before becoming head coach for the Drexler era. Our original Rookie of the Year, Geoff Petrie would average 24+ pts in 72-73 and 73-74, earning his second all-star nod, although once again, the Blazers will finish second to last in the NBA.

    Portland Public Schools headquarters would soon take out some stately looking homes. Above that, the Widmer Brothers would move into their current home, the dark brick warehouse just below the freeway, nineteen years after this photo. Right of that, hiding in the trees is the White Eagle Saloon, one of our oldest, built during the 1905 World Fair boom–in this pic it’s a hip music hangout after a previous stint as a rough biker bar, today it’s a favorite Mcmenamin’s historic pub and hotel. Ghosts aside, some great history on it here: https://portlandghosts.com/white-eagle-saloon/

    I’ve always enjoyed the towering Union Pacific chimney behind Fremont Bridge, hope that always stays. And the flying lima bean of a water tank at N. Going and Denver is visible in the background.

    It could be a stifling summer smog. The photo itself may have some discoloration or distortion. Or, maybe, just maybe, it’s because of House Bill 2936 that passed just four months prior to this photo, Oregon’s landmark decriminalization law supported by our favorite governor, Tom McCall: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0iFCZOnPvm4

  6. We used to take the Rose city transit bus (Broadway) from 27th and Ainsworth down to the coliseum to watch the Buckaroos play hockey and then wait at the corner of Interstate and Broadway (across from the Bekins building) to go home. That would have been real early seventies.

  7. So much to ponder! It’s 1pm, Aug 9, 1973 according to Efiles.

    But first, and most importantly, in the Veterans Memorial Coliseum, our beloved Trailblazers finished the 1972-73 season second to last in league, including a final game wallop by the Bucks–with 31 pts, 12 rebs from Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and 24 pts, 14 asts from Oscar Robertson. Our team included Larry Steele and Lloyd Neal, key members of our 1977 championship squad. Rick Adelman has just been traded to Chicago, but he soon returns to Oregon, first as coach at Chemeketa CC, then under Jack Ramsay and Mike Schuyler, before becoming head coach for the Drexler era. Our original Rookie of the Year, Geoff Petrie would average 24+ pts in 72-73 and 73-74, earning his second all-star nod, although once again, the Blazers will finish second to last in the NBA.

    Portland Public Schools headquarters would soon take out some stately looking homes. Above that, the Widmer Brothers would move into their current home, the dark brick warehouse just below the freeway, nineteen years after this photo. Right of that, hiding in the trees is the White Eagle Saloon, one of our oldest, built during the 1905 World Fair boom–in this pic it’s a hip music hangout after a previous stint as a rough biker bar, today it’s a favorite Mcmenamin’s historic pub and hotel. Ghosts aside, some great history on it here: https://portlandghosts.com/white-eagle-saloon/

    I’ve always enjoyed the towering Union Pacific chimney behind the Fremont Bridge, hope that always stays. And the flying lima bean of a water tank at N. Going and Denver is visible in the background.

    It could be a stifling summer smog. The photo itself may have some discoloration or distortion. Or, maybe, just maybe, it’s because of House Bill 2936 that passed just four months prior to this photo, Oregon’s landmark decriminalization law supported by our favorite governor, Tom McCall: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0iFCZOnPvm4

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