19 thoughts on “Forestry Building, 1905

  1. Inside the Forestry Building were displays that depicted the towering forests of Oregon. One of the most interesting was a miniature logging camp which showed a forest with trees being cut and snaked thru the forest with cables and loaded onto railroad cars by crane with a donkey engine. The loaded railroad cars would run along the track then disappear into a tunnel, only to reappear for another load. One display showed a family of beavers building a dam. Another display used a huge carved out log with water running thru it that showed how salmon were caught. There were fish wheels and a small cannery.
    The wildlife displays included majestic elk, clean-limbed deer, mountain lions, sneaking coyotes and bear. One display showed a mountain lion attacking a deer. Birds such as geese, ducks, grouse and prairie chickens were seen in glass cases. 2 Eagles were suspended from the ceiling with their wings outstretched as though in full flight. The Forestry Building was said to be the most unique exhibit in the United States. Patrons were known to spend all day in the building.

  2. debrald; No not paid for by taxpayer funds. The Lewis and Clark Expo which the forestry building was a part of was privately financed. It made a good profit.

  3. Although the “related” posts for this one include a good number of comments about this building, I didn’t see things among those comments from the Oregonian for that year. There were dozens of articles about the building. On March 6 (p. 8), even before it officially opened, “Of the buildings that are nearing completion at the Lewis and Clark Exposition grounds, the Forestry building seems to be attracting the greatest amount of attention. Hundreds of people visited the grounds yesterday afternoon and nearly all of them made it a point to observe closely the Forestry building.”

    On March 9 (p. 9), the Oregonian ran this story: “PALACE IS READY: Imposing Forestry Building Completed Yesterday. WORK HAS BEEN TEDIOUS” After several paragraphs about the exposition in general, and the Forestry Building in more detail, the article says: “Only the natural advantages of the Exposition made it possible to erect the great structure, as ordinary methods of transportation would not have served. The logs were towed up the Willamette from Clatsop County, where they were cut, and then floated into Guild’s Lake. A skidway was built from the shore of the lake to the site of the building, and the monster timbers were drawn into place by heavy cables and a big stationary engine.” There follow more details about the number and kinds of logs involved.

    Several days later (March 13, p. 8), the paper reported: “Two young girls yesterday … wandered up to the Forestry building, under the alcove. “Let’s get out of here quick,” said one of the girls, real suddenly. “The building is not braced very well, and is liable to fall on us.” Her companion actually ran out from under the building before she realized how ridiculous it was. She gazed up at the enormous timbers that supported the building and smiled, ‘A Kansas cyclone couldn’t hurt that building,” she said.”

    One of the funniest headlines I’ve ever seen accompanies a story about the building — “CONCATENATED ORDER OF HOO-HOO COMING.” ….”These Hoo-Hoo who will be entertained are the lumbermen, sawmill men, newspaper men and railroad men. In fact, those engaged in all allied industries, they say, for no other object than to promote the health, happiness and long life of the members.” Their executive committee “…succeeded in securing a good location in the Forestry building as its headquarters on the Fair grounds for the Hoo-Hoo during the annual meeting.” (Oregonian, April 30, 1905, p. 36)

  4. The picture, expanded out to the largest I can on my computer, give a wonderful view of the displays they had featured. The Bald Eagle, the Bear display, even the viewing public, the items in the display cabinets and the majestic wood structures are so cool. Was there a 2nd floor? It looks like there was.

  5. Liz- the HooHoos still exist! I met a great old guy who was a member and told me his son also joined. They were apparently better established in Washington and even had a “frat” house on the UW campus at one time. The black cat was their mascot (also used by other lumbermen/Wobblies?) and they kept some at the house!

  6. I was living on Upshur Street and watched it burn down. It was a gigantic blaze. Can you imagine with the lumber that made up the building. I grabbed my love birds and ran up to the Thurman St. Bridge until it was safe to go home. It was very sad.

  7. Robert G. is correct about the “Glaser Park Lodge ” having a similar aesthetic. The main lobby is copied from the Forestry Center which preceded its construction by ten years. However it is smaller in scale. Architecturally the two buildings have little in common other than the lobbies with their rustic exposed bark logs. The forestry center taking its inspiration from Doric Greek Temples and the Glaser park lodge borrowing heavily from Swiss rural vernacular buildings.

  8. Robert G. is correct about the “Glaser Park Lodge ” having a similar aesthetic. The main lobby is copied from the Forestry Center which preceded its construction by ten years. However it is smaller in scale. Architecturally the two buildings have little in common other than the lobbies with their rustic exposed bark logs. The forestry center taking its inspiration from Doric Greek Temples and the Glaser park lodge borrowing heavily from Swiss rural vernacular buildings.

  9. Mike, I have a friend whose family history goes back to the late 19th century as Portlanders. He showed me a certificate of donation to the Lewis and Clark Exposition which his family donated. It is a very beautiful document resembling a stock certificate.
    It was for $10. It is about 11″x17″ printed on cream colored paper with green ink like U.S. currency embellished with a gold foil seal and his ancestors name filled in hand signed in black ink.

  10. That mighty elk in the center of the photograph was most certainly a major feat of taxidermy.
    This was certainly the heyday of hat-wearing as everyone pictured here is wearing one; with the possible exception of one blond-haired boy. There are two men who have removed their hats upon coming in from outdoors and are holding them in their hands, one at his side and the other, behind his back (in the white suit).

  11. I just noticed the guy with the long white beard peeking out from the second balcony, where I spent many many hours of my childhood playing hide and seek. Admission was free and I recall no supervision or interference of any kind, only disapproving looks from adults, which we found hilarious. Such wonderful memories.

  12. At the time it burned, that building was substantially deteriorated. It was in need of serious rehabilitation or pulled down.
    Leaving bark on log constructions ensures they rapidly rot away.

  13. If I remember the upper balconies had been closed due to problems with safety. Portland at the time couldn’t wait to tear down the old and bring in the new. So the preservation of anything old was out of the question. It was a sad day when this building was lost, it was nearest thing to a cathedral that I had been or since then been in.

  14. You might want clarify that this building is not related to the current Forestry Center; it was one of the buildings at the 1905 Exposition at Guilds Lake in NW Portland, and no longer exists.

  15. I think that the reference was to Glacier Park, not Glaser Park. There are two early 20th Century Park Service rustic-style lodges in Glacier National Park in Montana: the Lake McDonald lodge on the southwest side of the park, and the Many Glacier Lodge on Swiftcurrent Lake on the east side of the park. I’ve stayed in both. The one on Lake McDonald has a full-height interior courtyard with vertical old-growth logs supporting the roof, with the lobby and restaurant on the main floor, and the lodging rooms off balconies along the walls.

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