26 thoughts on “SE Alder Street, 1960

  1. Vest Motors, located at 707 SE 82nd Ave, was one of 4 Oregon dealers who introduced a British car called the Singer Gazelle in Aug 1959. The Gazelle, made by Rootes Motors in Coventry, England was powered by a 4 cylinder engine with a 4 speed transmission, luxurious interior appointments and came in sedan, station wagon and convertible models. Pretty big deal at the time.

  2. Can anyone identify the classic car parked out front? It’s such a beauty from that era! A Ford Fairlane Victoria perhaps?

  3. That Ford was my first car! My dad bought it for me from a “friend” for $200 in 1965, and it burned oil like crazy. I eventually abandoned it on I-5, but that’s another story. Mine was the baby blue and white two-tone, and I miss two-toned cars. Nowadays almost all cars are gray, white and black, with the occasional red.

  4. That location was Gateway Toyota in the late 1960’s and in the 1970’s. I used to work right next door at a used car lot then.

  5. Definitely a 1959 Ford Fairlane. Not sure if Fairlane 500 though. I believe that Ford by that time had dropped the “Victoria” moniker for their premium offering and were transferring into the “Galaxy” name.

  6. Definitely a 1959 Ford Fairlane. Not sure if Fairlane 500 though. I believe that Ford by that time had dropped the “Victoria” moniker for their premium offering and were transferring into the “Galaxy” name.

  7. Why do you suppose parked cars were perpendicular to the building in the 1960 photo, but are parallel parked today? In the current view, the sidewalks look old — like they’ve been there for a while in any case.

  8. Sparkles I looked at a 1960 aerial photo of Alder street and it does appear to be narrow and unimproved with no sidewalks, but by 1975 sidewalks are in, and the street is wider.

  9. The reason I asked about the car was because my Dad had a ’57 Ford Fairlane at that time that looked just like the car in the photo. Same colors, same style, same everything. I’m sure it isn’t the exact same car since we lived on the other end of town, but man that Ford Fairlane was a beaut, very roomy, and such a nice ride!

  10. I agree with Robin and Merlin and David J, it’s definitely a 1957 because that’s what my blue one was. And it didn’t have a name because it was the proverbial POS. My dad’s friend clearly ripped him off!

  11. Susan, Found On Road Dead was the unofficial Ford nickname. I had a white 58 4dr sedan with the Police Interceptor 352 CID that really flew. Purchased used in 1964 for $500 with 65,000 miles on the odometer. Got about 9-10 MPG, regular gas about 29 cents a gallon at the time.

  12. I was running late this morning and couldn’t take the time to comment on this post. I thought perhaps the cars parked in the showroom were “English Fords” like my grandparents had at this time, for a spare car. But I was unsure since the English Ford engine hood didn’t open from the front. I’ve never run across Singer automobiles, so this was a piece of interesting news. Thanks.

  13. Thanks for great info tomjones3! I left mine on I-5 when it broke down for the umpteenth time and hitched a ride with a trucker. So Found on Road Dead was in fact true. Mine had 100,000 miles when my dad bought it, and the odometer didn’t work, but I suspect it got similar mileage. Every time I filled up, they gave me free oil from the dump bin. I don’t think those are allowed any more. Great memories.

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