10 thoughts on “NE Killingsworth Street, 1954

  1. Today’s View: It’s a repeating pattern across this city, a modest, intact neighborhood is impacted with a hideous 4 story monstrosity that degrades the surrounding buildings and people who have to live there. It’s sad that urban planners allow this to happen over and over.
    I know what their excuse is, and it won’t ever justify this.

  2. The telephone pole on the right has that striping on it because it had a fire department alarm on it at one time.

  3. That building out of view on the near corner is very interesting with apartments above (Google street view image can be manipulated to see it). Those two single family dwellings just beyond the gas station are still around, but “can’t win”; once next to a smelly service station and now greatly overshadowed by a boxy apartment building.
    It’s nice to see the other building is still around too.

  4. Interesting to note that in 1954 the stop sign faced the Killingsworth traffic, not the NE 30th traffic. That’s because the Alberta Streetcar used to pass through this intersection along 30th Avenue on its way north and south to the end of the line near Ainsworth.

    Read more about the Alberta Streetcar:
    https://alamedahistory.org/2017/02/28/alberta-streetcar-catalyst-for-change/

    You can also read more about Foxchase. Some people have taken to calling this busy, foodie intersection by its underlying plat name.
    https://alamedahistory.org/2017/03/25/northeast-portlands-foxchase-whats-in-a-name/

    The Foxchase plat was filed way back in 1889 by Eugenie and J. Carroll McCaffrey. Their story, their vision for the neighborhood they imagined here, and his interesting connection with a major American crime case make for interesting reading.

  5. Mr. Lord,

    Everyone already has their own opinion, and we don’t require yours. We already know whether we like it or not without you telling us. This one is certainly unattractive, but there are others that are better looking. I wish there was a good alternative. I like living in the city, and I am glad I have not been priced out of it and forced to live in a sprawling suburb. And as this one seems from its appearance that it might be a low-income building, I would rather folks live in it than in the parks.

  6. Edge Lord since you posted the streetview of this corner, please look at a image from 3 or 4 years back, and you will see that the only building that was eliminated was the remnant of the old Shell Gas Station, which had long been closed, and was used as a U-Haul rental site with a 6′ barbed wire fence around it. None of the homes on either side of this property appear to have been demolished. Looks like a better use for this property now..

  7. I’m not anti-development or anti-apartment building. Not at all. But that new building where the UHaul used to be is a giant middle finger to the neighborhood.

  8. They can either build “up” or “out”. “Out” is where I live in Southwest Washington or “out” is in East county etc. The problem is not Mayors, voters, contractors, etc. It’s too many people. I volunteer at a very popular tourist destination in the gorge. Most people inform me that their town has doubled or tripled in size. Like I have stated in the past I wish I could live a couple of hundred years to see how this all plays out.

  9. all historic buildings are still standing but the boxy apartment building is so ugly !! and and the wacky colors suck i wonder what use to be there before ?

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