12 thoughts on “Downtown Portland, 1974

  1. It looks like Waterfront Park is taking shape. Notice the traffic on I-5 or lack of! So much to look at. Great pic.

  2. Looks like the removal of Harbor Drive is well underway. At this time, the city was enjoying the completion of many major transportation projects: The Marquam/Fremont/405/I-5 freeway ring around the city. The Vista Ridge tunnels (just left of the First National Bank Tower) and transforming Harbor Drive into Waterfront Park. At the same time, the fight over the Mt Hood Freeway was still ongoing. Big time moments in shaping Portland’s transportation history.

  3. You can make out the mooring place of the battleship Oregon, What happened to her during the early days of WW2 borders on criminal negligence . Fortunately other ships like the Texas and the Olympia were spared the ignominious fate of the Oregon.

  4. @Greg. Sure, it would have been fun to see the USS Oregon (commissioned 1890) sitting on the River but I’m not sure it’s worth the price. The USS Texas (commissioned in 1914 and was a working ship through WWII), has become a maintenance nightmare. Evidently it’s leaking like a sieve. From Wikipedia: “On May 28, 2019, it was reported that the Texas would be undergoing $35 million worth of repairs and then be moved further up the Texas coast, largely due to a decline in visitors at its current location.”

  5. Hindsight is always 20/20. It is impossible to adequately imagine in the present time the state of panic, in this country, that the outbreak of world war brought about. Our unpreparedness, the unending shock of early battlefield losses, the desperate need for general mobilization of military, industrial processes and civilian attitudes toward the sacrifice that would be required called for desperate measures.
    Scrap drives provided not just needed resources, but a boost to morale for everyone, a visible commitment to the cause. Every panic results in excess and WW2 was not an exception. A great many historic objects fell victim to scrap drives, and that is regrettable. But we rallied and made huge contributions through shared sacrifice to the ultimate Allied victory. The sacrifice of the Oregon at that time was in it’s way glorious. RIP USS Oregon.
    Now what shall we say about the many more recent sacrifices we see in this photo.

  6. The ramp coming off the Marquam Bridge going north was the most exciting ride in town. It was designed for two lanes, but traffic backed up, so it was restriped for three narrow lanes. It was congested and the traffic was fast, with a scary dropoff on both sides. As a young driver, I enjoyed it. I probably would approach it with more trepidation now.

  7. The Marion Hotel sat on the NW corner of 1st and Madison. I did not realize how deceiving the first avenue side looked from the street. There were 5 windows (on 2 floors) along 1st avenue side but it appeared as though it was two different buildings. The sixth window was a blind space and was the division between building next door.

  8. I was unable to post my photo on this site. It is posted under the Facebook Vintage Portland site

  9. Funny that the ‘Black Box’ building was up already before some of the later ones that had a much more dated look eventually. That building still looks modern! And I love the floating docks on the waterfront. I remember fishing off those in the mid 70’s after my friends mom would just drop us off at the waterfront and leave us there all afternoon. We must had been 12 years old tops……can you even imagine parents doing that now?

  10. @joan As far as I can tell the only way to add photos to this site is if you have a web address for the photo. I have added photos via a Dropbox sharing technique where you right-click on the photo in Dropbox and copy the link. Those photos will disappear in the future whenever my Dropbox account disappears.

    You could try copying the FB web address for your photo and see if that works.

  11. I HATE THE MODERN BUILDINGS BECAUSE THEY DESTROYED THE BEAUTIFUL
    CAST IRON BUILDINGS FROM THE 1880s WE HAD HUNDREDS OF THEM ALONG THE WATER FRONT THEY WHERE BUILT BETWEEN 1850 AND 1880 ONLY A HAND FULL STILL STAND TODAY THE NEW MARKET BLOCK WAS BUILT IN 1872
    ITS THE MOST BEAUTIFUL BUILDING IN PORTLAND ! GOD BLESS

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