Reservoir 3, 1894

Looking northeast on Reservoir 3 with contractors Keatinge and Plettenberg posing, 1894.

 

City of Portland (OR) Archives, Reservoir 3 looking northeast with contractors Keatinge and Plettenberg on dam, A2008-009, 1894.

 

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11 thoughts on “Reservoir 3, 1894

  1. The Oregonian, August 7, 1892: “Of Interest to Builders. A New Style of Construction for Concrete Sidewalks, Etc.” tells about a new way to build concrete walks and floors. “This method of construction makes a stronger and much more durable walk…. The work is being done by Messrs. Keatinge and Leonard, who have just introduced this style of work in Portland. Their office is room 65, Union block, and Mr. Keatinge said yesterday, while talking to a reporter: “this style of construction is going to revolutionise [sic] the methods now in vogue of laying concrete flooring and sidewalks.”

    An article in the Oregonian two years later (October 1, 1894) says Keatinge and Leonard signed a contract with the Roman Catholic archbishop to build a new cathedral at Davis, Everett, Fifteenth and Sixteenth streets.

  2. The latest satellite image I could find shows the reservoir drained and work being done on it. 124 years old and still in use!

  3. Where did Portland get the money for the ambition public works projects at the turn of the century? I know that Portland was ahead of Seattle for a time. Were common taxes enough to fund all the projects?

  4. Adam, at the turn of the century(1900) Portland was the second richest city on the West coast only exceeded by San Francisco and one of the top 10 in the US. Some of the classic measures of a cities wealth and influence is the number of companies headquartered in it, the number of branch offices of prominent companies it has, the number of branch manufacturing plants of national companies and the number of distribution hubs of national companies. Portland had lots in all of these categories in 1900. It was also a major transshipment point for imports and exports on the West Coast.

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