10 thoughts on “N Broadway, 1938

  1. We’ve seen Verna’s Lunch building before:

    That image claims to be from 1937, and today’s from 1938, but I suspect that one date or the other is incorrect. There are quite a fe changes on that corner for a year’s timespan.

  2. This intersection was redone in 1927, and the pedestrian subways were added. A few years later, Portland city council did a study and was disappointed to find the subways not being used as they had hoped. The tunnels were populated by the homeless and most pedestrians would cross surface street above rather than go below and take the risk of assault, robbery, etc. Similar to the underground restrooms at Pioneer Courthouse.

  3. I wonder if this guy had to go fight in the war. My dad’s generation was children of the depression, and THEN they had to go and fight the war. But they didn’t have to go to Eruope to “find” themselves. They knew what they had to do and di it. Him and his brothers went to college on the GI bill, after the war, then, thankfully he moved out here, from Iowa. He used to joke that the only thing to do on Saturday night in Marshalltown, Iowa (where he met my mother), was go down and watch the bacon-slicer work.

    John

  4. The pedestrian subways were in use into the 1960s. I used them to get to the bus stop after attending Portland Buckaroos games. Never saw any homeless people in them but the smell suggested that they were also used for a purpose other than walking.

  5. There was one going east/west under Interstate at Ainsworth when I was growing up in the late 70’s early 80’s. I believe it had been gated by then and was nothing more than a large trash can. Filled in mid 80’s I believe.

  6. Great work truck example. The beat up wooden tool bins on its runningboards. Interesting its on blocks to sit level, Probably something to do with its mounted air compressor.

  7. The “Good Eats” name of restaurant was certainly ahead of it’s time (i.e. Alton Browns cooking show of the same name).

  8. I agree with oldwxwatcher. In the 60’s if you tried to cross at street level, you were a brave soul. As youngsters we used the subway and never ran into bums, homeless. I think at that time they were mostly on West Burnside rather than being all over town like they are now.

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