11 thoughts on “Tanner Creek Sewer, 1917

  1. taken near NW 9th and Nw lovejoy, just north of the train station horse barns.
    not sure why they took a photo of the street over it. nice photo of a 4-6-0 tho.

  2. it looks like they took this photo to show the restoration of the street surface; the efiles state ‘relating to the reconstruction of tcs’ but the city has files talking about it being abandoned and filled-in in 1916.
    so perhaps just documenting that this was finished properly.

    curious about the logo on photograph: ‘city of portland, water’ perhaps?

  3. The Spokane Portland & Seattle (SP&S) Locomotive in the foreground is a 4-6-0 road class D-1 built by the Baldwin Locomotive Co.in 1910 for the Great Northern RR as their class E-14 road #1049. The GN was one of the SP&S parent companies. The parentage explains the “Belpair” square firebox on the locomotive.It is configured as a oil burner with a tender designed to provide clear vision to the rear as an aid to switching in a time when switching operations depended upon hand signals this was a great aid to safety. It met the scrapper in May of 1937. This information comes to us from Spokane Portland and Seattle RY., The Northwest’s Own Railway by Charles and Dorthy Wood published by Superior.

  4. thanks rod! i was hung up on it being an sp engine, and their 10-wheelers were different. i did see the ‘great northern route’ tender in background, but couldn’t see enough to tell what it was.

    a curiosity about this pic: it states ‘proposed tanner looking west near nw front;’ this can’t be the case, as the turntable was further to the sw of the spot where all the ‘tanner’ sewers crossed front.
    the turntable is between 9th and 10th just to the north of a lateral sewer connection to the original tanner (which was in 9th), and this photo seems to look west along that sewer line.

    all the -other- photos in the folder show construction of the replacement tanner, which was a metal pipe and ran under nw 10th.

    for more fun, the 1908 sanborns show a proposed turntable and tracks being further south along 9th, below lovejoy. city documents from 2015 show a turntable north of lovejoy – which is where i am assuming this photo is. the 1920s sanborns for the area are missing, sadly.

    so. where WAS the turntable? if was closer towards front and 9th, than the photo does indeed look westward along the proposed tanner combined sewer of 1917. if it is above lovejoy, we are looking at the path of a lateral. south of lovejoy, we’d actually be looking along the path of another lateral collector, and not the 1917 sewer.

    the 2015 doc is here:
    http://www.deq.state.or.us/Webdocs/Controls/Output/PdfHandler.ashx?p=853a3770-a1d4-4ef1-9568-15fecd2bce81.pdf

    fun read.

    also, don’t dig in the pearl district.

  5. this is clearly the 1908 turntable. when did they build the turntable at 9th and what would now be marshall? it is on the 1908-50 sanborns.

    in any event, the efile caption still can’t be right.

  6. This aerial view of the SP&S yard is wonderful. The “Manning Warehouse & Transfer Co.” building was later to be adorned with “The Milwaukee Road” in the 1970s when that road was granted trackage rights into Portland as a result of the GN-NP-Burlington-SP&S merger.

  7. @wl I believe that the turn table in illustrated your above post was either left in place or was relocated for the convenience of the Portland Terminal RR to serve the occasional need to turn a freight car in order to re-orientate a door. Such as a auto car end door or perhaps a car in which the lading had shifted such as to block the door presented.
    Also I heartily endorse your admonition “don’t dig in the Pearl District”. I would only add. Do not ask why. There can be no possible truthful answer that would make the questioner feel cheerful.

  8. I didn’t expect to see the engine number resolved on the side of the headlight, but there it is- number 106. These old photos often have excellent resolution!

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