Unidentified Location, St. Johns, 1932

The location of this St. Johns area building is unknown. Does it still exist? The presence of the man with the number is usually an indication of an upcoming public works project, most likely road widening. Good luck in finding this.

Found: Northeast corner N. Ivanhoe Street and N. John Avenue.

A2009-009.2608 Unidentified building in St Johns 1932(City of Portland Archives)

14 thoughts on “Unidentified Location, St. Johns, 1932

  1. I would say it is the N.E. corner of N. Ivanhoe and N. John ave. The trim on the building visible behind it looks very similar to the trim of the extant building on the N.W. corner of that intersection.

  2. I am with CJ, I think both buildings are still standing, along with modifications.
    “St Johns church, corner of North Ivanhoe and North John avenue, Rev. A. H. Schmalle: 11 A.M. “Leadership and Increase” ”
    Oregonian, 9/18/1932, page 49

  3. Yep, I agree with CJ and oldoregon. Both buildings are still there. The front of the building has been extended out towards the sidewalk (where the steps in the photo are). If you look at it from above in Google Earth you can see the original building outline and the two additions. The “stepped” facade above the entrance is still visible on one side as well. Google Earth identifies it now as the “Portland Miracle Revival Church”.

  4. That is an impressive stack of slabs. Rich in pitch bark and splinters. And of coarse BTU”s. The by products of the ubiquitous log rafts we find in so many of the postings we find on this site. The other fuel produced by the local sawmills was of coarse sawdust. Before the advent of the many Kraft process mills in our area all this wood “waste” went up in smoke. These slabs are intended for a commercial boiler/burner as they are trimmed to four feet length. Were they intended for residential use they would be delivered in two foot lengths. Nice job of stacking.

  5. According to Portlandmaps.com, the building at 8333 N Ivanhoe was built in 1927, so it fits the time frame for this photo.

  6. Unlikely this wood was ever in a log raft . The Logs in rafts were destine for local saw mills to be cut into lumber for construction, “peeler” logs for plywood production, chipped for paper production, or to shipped over seas for all of the aforementioned.

  7. @Carol Koehler Cima according to the folks at City of Portland Archives these photos were taken by the city. The numbers on the card represent either block or lot #.

  8. Morning Oregonian, June 19, 1926, p 9

    title: Churches Ask to Build. paragraph 2: “… the United Evangelical Church plans an ediface at Ivanhoe and Johns streets.”

    Sanborn Maps 1924-1928, vol 3 1924, sheet 336:

    The NE corner of N. Ivanhoe and N. John is the site of the United Evangelical Church. The diagram of the building includes a square labeled ‘spire’ and the notation 50′ (feet).

    The map shows that N. John ran south though N. Ivanhoe when it was published, whereas today, heading south on N. John takes you into the post office parking lot. There was a new post office constructed in on N. Ivanhoe in 1931-32, but it was between N. Alta and N. Baltimore, three or four blocks to the west at 8720 N. Ivanhoe. The Sanborn map shows only lots with dwellings, and some empty lots, to the south of N. Ivanhoe, where the current post office (1984) and Safeway are located now.

    The footprint of the United Evangelical Church in the Sanborn map is smaller than the footprint visible on the Google maps satellite view; the church building did not extend right up to the property line with the dwelling to the east, as is does today.

    The footprints of the two dwellings to the east of the church in the Sanborn map do match the footprints of the houses visible on the Google maps satellite view.

    The Sanborn map shows a service station at N. Charleston and N. Jersey. Signal Station Pizza now occupies the service station building there, but the cross street is N. Lombard. N. Jersey west of N. Richmond was renamed to N. Lombard sometime after the Sanborn map was published.

    As noted in the description of the photo, a numbered card in the photo often indicates that the building in the photo might or would be impacted by public works, especially road widening. The St. Johns Bridge opened in 1931, and soon after there were calls from the business community to build an extension of Columbia Blvd to the bridge head. The location may have been in one path proposed for the extension that was ultimately abandoned in favor of another.

  9. I lived in ST. Johns 1948-52. Back many times after moving to S.E. Division st, Portland. In the 1970’s, I owned ST. Johns paint and wallpaper store.

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