Archive for the ‘Downtown’ Category

SW 4th and Morrison, 1940

July 10, 2014

The photograph for today is of a street car going through the busy downtown intersection at SW 4th Avenue and Morrison Street. Fred Meyer, Dr. J. J. Colton, Dentist, and Chown Hardware are just a few of the businesses that line these downtown streets in 1940.

SW 4th Ave. and Morrison St. 1940 : A2005-001.863

SW 4th Ave. and Morrison St. 1940 : A2005-001.863

 

View this image in Efiles by clicking here.

City Hall, circa 1905

June 23, 2014

In 2009, Dan Davis started a new blog called Vintage Portland that grew to become a very popular site for a community of people interested in Portland’s history. The City of Portland Archives & Records Center (PARC) is not only a fan of Vintage Portland, we’ve also been quiet collaborators. Dan approached us in 2009 because he was interested in using some of our photos he found in Efiles, our online database. We were delighted to work with Dan as a way to showcase many of the City’s photographs. Our collaboration continued when we approached Dan (and this great community) for help in identifying some of our “mystery” images.

PARC has enjoyed our association with Dan and the Vintage Portland community; and while we are sad that Dan has decided to move away from managing the site, we’re also very excited that Dan has asked us to take over the Vintage Portland site! As of June 23, 2013, PARC will begin administering the Vintage Portland blog and other social media platforms. We are thrilled by the opportunity to continue to engage Vintage Portland followers by featuring the City’s extensive collection of photos. We also plan on inviting other institutions to share some of their photos because there is a rich visual history of Portland held within many local archives. There will be a few changes to the site, mostly cosmetic and procedural. Please let us know if you have any questions about the transition or about the collections in general. Many thanks to Dan and this incredible community he has helped create! We are looking forward to continuing the tradition.

 

City Hall from 5th Ave and Jefferson St. circa 1905 : A2011-014

City Hall from 5th Ave and Jefferson St. circa 1905 : A2011-014

 

 

Portland Aerial, c1926

June 12, 2014

The Portland of circa 1926 is familiar to us today but oh, so many changes! All of our downtown river crossings were in place, including a new Burnside Bridge. It would be another three-quarters of a century before all the rails in Northwest would be ripped up to create the Pearl District. The west side seawall was only a few years from realization, and the relentless march of the bulldozers had yet to create the patchwork of surface parking lots that in many cases still exist. On the east side, the riverfront was still highly industrial, Albina was untouched, and it would be decades before freeways cut off much of this area from the river.

A2004-002.73 Portland from the Air c1926(City of Portland Archives)

SW Front & Vine, c1929

June 11, 2014

This 1929 photo shows a row of magnificent cast-iron fronted buildings along the east side of SW Front Avenue at the foot of Vine Street. Vine no longer exists but is a part of Ankeny Plaza between Ankeny and Ash Streets. From the left, the buildings are Dodd Block (1888), Cooks’ Building (1882), Ankeny & Watson Building (1868), and Central Block (1879) on the corner at Ash Street. All were demolished in 1942.

A2009-009.2495 Looking east at SW Front between Ankeny & Ash 1929(City of Portland Archives)

SW Washington St, 1910

June 9, 2014

Looking west on SW Washington through its intersection with 3rd Avenue, we can see that streetcar and horse traffic were the main (or maybe only) modes of transportation in downtown Portland in 1910. The Dekum and Spalding Buildings straddle Washington in the foreground, while the Perkins Hotel at 5th Avenue can be identified by its pyramidal roof.

SW Washington looking west from 3rd Ave 1910(City of Portland Archives)

SW Broadway & Columbia, 1950

May 28, 2014

SW Broadway downtown was a one-way street until it reached Columbia Street in 1950 (here looking north). South of here Broadway was still two-way. A little more discussion about changing to a one-way grid is here in this earlier post.

A2005-001.99 SW Broadway and Columbia north 1950(City of Portland Archives)

SW 1st & Oak, c1950s

April 10, 2014

The Failing Building, on the northwest corner of SW 1st and Oak Street, looks much the same here in the 1950s as it did when constructed in 1886. Besides paint and signage, it’s still largely intact today, a fine example of 19th Century architecture with cast-iron details.

failing building c1950s 8131(University of Oregon Libraries)


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