Alberta Line Streetcar, 1944

This 1944 photo shows an Alberta Line streetcar at its terminus at NE 30th Avenue and Ainsworth Street. An article in the June 16, 1940 The Oregonian describes the new retail development on the southwest corner (left) and six-unit bungalow court development on the southeast corner.

A2009-009.4152 Streetcar along Alberta Line 1944(City of Portland Archives)

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16 Responses to “Alberta Line Streetcar, 1944”

  1. Dennis Says:

    It looks to me that the building on the north east corner is still there, but it has been remodeled

  2. Bill Hall Says:

    I know this intersection very well. I grew up half a block to the north (1964-1987). Both of the foreground buildings were gone by the time my parents purchased our home. The building on the southwest had been replaced by the Ainsworth Food Center and the bungalows had given way to a Rexall pharmacy. I don’t recall any visible traces of the streetcar tracks in the streets by then.

  3. billy Says:

    this is gorgeous. it took me a few minutes of looking at the photo to discover it’s a view to the north. I spent a lot of time commuting through here on my bike!

  4. Brian Says:

    The bungalow building on the southeast corner is still there, but it has an addition on the north side facing Ainsworth and a remodeled ground-level wall along 30th. However the upper floor windows, siding and roofline are identical to the one on the photo.

    http://goo.gl/maps/ztAAM

  5. Brian Says:

    Actually, looking at it again I think there were two identical (well, probably mirror image L-shaped) bungalows next to each other on 30th. The northern most is the one in the photo above and it has indeed been demolished. It’s twin is still attached to the south end of the retail space that was built to replace it. Sorry for my confusion!

  6. Brian Says:

    This aerial view shows what I mean and what confused me in the photo. The L-shaped bungalow to the south of the retail space is just like the one in the photo but clearly too far south to be the same one.

  7. Dan Davis Says:

    I’d guess that the western portion was moved south to make way for the addition. I’ve uploaded the (poor quality) photo from The Oregonian showing that both buildings appear to line up along Ainsworth at the time they were built.
    http://vintageportland.files.wordpress.com/2014/01/30th-ainsworth-oregonian.jpg?w=450

  8. mark Says:

    I would love to have that panel van.

  9. lefty Says:

    Poking up right above the “Ice Cream” sign, but further back, is the bell tower for the Ainsworth United Church of Christ. I might even hazard a guess that the 1940′s brick storefront with gabled dormers was purposefully designed to echo the church architecture across the street. (Not like the utiliarian no-character building found there now…)
    http://goo.gl/maps/zj80R

    As a matter of fact, the SE bunglaow complex might echo the architecture on the NE corner as well. Hey! Propserity follows the streetcar! (enter your arguments below…)

  10. Fred Stewart Says:

    Reblogged this on Oregon Real Estate Round Table.

  11. Jack Says:

    I use to catch and ride the Alberta streetcar at the corner of Alberta and Union Ave. and ride it down to the Steel Bridge in the 1940′s.

  12. David Johnson Says:

    Grew up on 32nd and Ainsworth in the late 60′s early 70′s. Ainsworth food market was known as “Harker’s”.. It also burned down in late 50′s I believe.

  13. Kenn Says:

    There are other pictures of the streetcar at this corner, but I have no idea how to attach them as can be done with an email.

  14. knickatknite Says:

    I’ve delivered mail on this route before, very cool to see the building on the Northeast corner still looks very similar today!

  15. Nancy Gemmell Says:

    How I loved those trams/streetcars. Where I live now (Paisley, Scotland) they also did away with them, and many people regret that.

  16. Jeanie Says:

    We lived in the first house to the east of the apartments from 1980-1990. One of the tenants of the apartments had lived there since the 1940′s

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